Note: If you’re bored/annoyed by the first section of this post, please feel free to skip to the 2nd section that begins near the teal-highlighted call-out

As I wrote about in my previous post, this is an exciting time for the 92-year-old Pine Hills Country Club, and I think the club and Drew Rogers’ upcoming renovation work, combined with some potential national media play during the now 2021 Ryder Cup at Whistling Straits is going to help skyrocket the course’s image nationally.

How it’s stayed as low-key as it has – even in the state – for so long is a mystery to me.

That Pine Hills doesn’t appear in any of the state rankings amazes me, though I think recently it’s because the course hasn’t been rated often enough. That will change soon, I’m sure, too.

I’m not saying the major publications’ rankings are the Bible on golf courses, nor am I saying Pine Hills should care. What I am saying is I think it’s as good of a private member golf course as there is in Wisconsin.

Keep in mind, in the following current “major rankings,” that Pine Hills does not qualify for public courses. I’m including them to provide a transferable framework for where they could/should fit in.

In this first list (Golf Digest’s top 10 overall courses in the state), for example, I think Pine Hills post-renovation has potential to reach the top 3-5. It belongs in the top 7 already, if you ask me.

Golf Digest’s 2019-2020 Top 10 Courses in Wisconsin (2019):
* Public & Private
1. Whistling Straits, Straits course
2. Erin Hills
3. Milwaukee Country Club
4. Blackwolf Run, River course
5. Sand Valley, Sand Valley course
6. Sand Valley, Mammoth Dunes course
7. Whistling Straits, Irish course
8. SentryWorld
9. Blue Mound Golf & Country Club
10. Blackwolf Run, Meadow Valleys course

Here’s how those figures translate nationally:

Golf Digest’s 2019-2020 Top 100 Public Courses, Wisconsin (2019):
* Public Only
3. Whistling Straits, Straits course
9. Erin Hills
15. Blackwolf Run, River course
18. Sand Valley, Sand Valley course
27. Sand Valley, Mammoth Dunes course
43. Whistling Straits, Irish course
44. SentryWorld
57. Blackwolf Run, Meadow Valleys
58. Lawsonia, Links course
69. Troy Burne

Golf Digest’s Top 100 Golf Courses, Wisconsin (2019-2020):
* Public & Private
21. Whistling Straits, Straits course
42. Erin Hills
74. Milwaukee Country Club
97. Blackwolf Run, River course

Next is a public ranking by GolfWeek. As it stands, I think Pine Hills belongs a little before the Irish course, SentryWorld (which is tremendous, although closed for the 2020 season), the Meadow Valleys course and U-Ridge.

As a private club, Pine Hills does not qualify for this list, but it’s relevant for comparative purposes.

Aside: How can anyone put Erin Hills as the #6 public course in the state? I understand rankings are based on opinion, but it feels like a miss.

GolfWeek Best Courses You Can Play in Wisconsin (2019):
* Public Only
1. Whistling Straits, Straits course
2. Sand Valley, Mammoth Dunes course
3. Sand Valley, Sand Valley course
4. Lawsonia, Links course
5. Blackwolf Run, River course
6. Erin Hills
7. Whistling Straits, Irish course
8. SentryWorld
9. Blackwolf Run, Meadow Valley course
10. University Ridge
11. Troy Burne
12. The Bull at Pinehurst Farms
13. Geneva National, Player course
14. Wild Rock
15. Big Fish

This next list is an interesting one: If Milwaukee’s #49, the Links course at Lawsonia is #62 and Blue Mound is #148, Pine Hills should really be included.

GolfWeek Top 200 Classic Courses, Wisconsin (2019):
* Public & Private
49. Milwaukee Country Club
62. Lawsonia, Links course
148. Blue Mound Golf & Country Club

Here’s another interesting one… Like I said, I think Pine Hills should be #2 here, and that it could potentially get to #1 with some smart, subtle changes during their upcoming renovations. Blue Mound’s awesome, but I personally give PHCC an edge and put Blue Mound at #3.

I should mention I haven’t played Oneida or Green Bay. I hear great things about both but can’t imagine either challenges MCC, Pine Hills or Blue Mound for the top 3.

West Bend is fantastic, too, by the way.

GolfWeek Top Private Courses by State, Wisconsin (2019):
* Private Only
1. Milwaukee Country Club
2. Blue Mound Golf & Country Club
3. Oneida Golf & Country Club
4. Green Bay Country Club
5. West Bend Country Club

Golf.com hasn’t published a top 100 national list since 2018, but I think Pine Hills has the opportunity to break on to theirs’, potentially alongside or slightly ahead of the River course at Blackwolf Run.

Golf.com Top 100 Courses in the US, Wisconsin (2017-2018):
* Public & Private
28. Whistling Straits, Straits course
52. Sand Valley, Sand Valley course
74. Erin Hills
84. Milwaukee Country Club
100. Blackwolf Run, River course

I like a listing that has the Links course at Lawsonia (one of my favorite places in the world) as a top 150 course in the world, but it’s tough to get behind.

Golf.com Top 100 Courses in the World, Wisconsin (2020-2021):
* Public & Private
69. Whistling Straits, Straits course

* Lawsonia, Links course (World next 50)
* Sand Valley, Sand Valley (World next 50)

As you can see, there are spaces on all these [not public only] lists where a previously anonymous course can potentially fit in.

I think the time is right for Pine Hills to invest in their club and course (which they are), and afterwards I think we’ll start seeing “Pine Hills CC, Sheboygan WI” in a lot of lists going forward.

PART# 2: Comparing the state’s 2 best private clubs

So, how does Pine Hills compare now to the perennially top-ranked private golf course in Wisconsin, Milwaukee CC?

Keep in mind, this is all my personal opinion. All rankings and ratings within golf are, and I understand that my preferences for golf courses are not everyone else’s. They’re certainly not the same as the major publications’.

Milwaukee Country Club has always been the incumbent. No other private course in Wisconsin has probably ever even been considered.

Currently ranked by Golf Digest as the #74 course in the country (link), Milwaukee oozes rich heritage and tradition, features terrific golf holes both on the Milwaukee River and inland, and was recently updated by Tom Doak and his team in 2015.

It’s a hallowed ground that’s challenging to get on, and the anticipation of a round at Milwaukee Country Club can bring about butterflies, or anxiety in even the biggest golf enthusiast.

Yet, does its exclusivity make it the unquestioned number one private golf course in the state?

When considering course design and customer experience, I have a hard time saying it’s better than Pine Hills. I also have a hard time saying it’s not. I waffle between the two enough that I might as well call them 1-A and 1-B.

There are no losers here. It’s rare air. Some people who read this will say I’m an idiot for comparing the two at all – Milwaukee is clearly the best because it’s such an honor to play it, and its incredible heritage makes it better. Oh, and because CH Alison was a historically significant golf course architect while it’s hard to find much about Pine Hills’ designer, Harry Smead.

As an aside, I’m told Smead worked with or was a protege of Langford & Moreau’s. There are a lot of similarities between Langford & Moreau’s design and aesthetics and those of Pine Hills, especially in the green complexes, use of mounding and structuring of bunkers.

Here is how I compare the two clubs by key category:

Conditions: Milwaukee

Both courses are magnificently maintained, but green complexes like the 9th with their closely shorn green surrounds are so compelling that I’m sending the nod to MCC.

Par 3’s: Pine Hills

Pine Hills might have the most memorable set of par threes in the entire state of Wisconsin, and despite a quality set at Milwaukee wins this category easily.

My favorite par 3’s at Pine Hills:
1. 9th (170/145/135/114) – this is how I picture golf at Augusta
2. 5th (195/182/175/165) – uphill par 3 with a massive, tiered green
3. 14th (134/123/114/114) – I love a great short par 3
4. 7th (208/172/155/125) – the long downhill par 3 with amazing views
5. 16th (148/141/126/122) – uphill shot with a tough green

Par 4’s: Pine Hills

Along with a handful of great, incredibly memorable par fours, Pine Hills’ overall collection is solid. Stalwarts among those truly memorable holes are the 8th, 10th, 13th and 17th.

Par 5’s: Milwaukee

Neither course’s par fives are their biggest strength, but Pine Hills’ three-shot holes are more legitimate. The one that does not fit that mold is the 12th, which is the second in a set of back-to-back par fives that play in opposite directions.

While the 12th measures just 458 yards from the tips and 450 from the first tees in, its dramatically rolling fairway makes for a challenging [and oftentimes blind] approach shot to a heavily guarded green to get home in two.

While the 10th at Milwaukee is a gorgeous golf hole, and an incredible photo opportunity with the Milwaukee River as a backdrop, it and the 7th are both better played as long fours (as they are for the Wisconsin State Amateur) for scratch players. A more normal player like myself (8-10 handicap) still finds plenty of challenge in them.

Based purely on memorability, the edge here goes to Milwaukee.

The beautiful par five 10th at Milwaukee CC

Closing holes: Milwaukee

The 9th and 18th at Milwaukee might be its two best holes. The 9th is all-world, with an elevated tee shot heading straight toward the clubhouse.

Similarly, the 18th finishes outside the clubhouse and features an outstanding, back-to-front green complex.

Course Layout & Use of the Land: Pine Hills

Pine Hills is dramatic. There are very few level shots, whether off the tee or when approaching its greens. Milwaukee has some elevated tee boxes and greens, but nowhere near the ups and downs.

Both courses use the rivers that go through them well: The Pigeon River winds through the 7th, 8th, 10th and 17th at Pine Hills, and the Milwaukee River bisects or provides a border for the 10th thru 15th holes at MCC.

Bunkering: Milwaukee

Pine Hills’ dramatic land use and highly contoured greens barely require bunkering, and use of sand is nowhere near as prominent as it is at Milwaukee.

Milwaukee’s bunkering is beautiful. Players need only to look at the magnificent par three 8th, par four 11th and the recently updated par five 3rd as prime examples.

Greens: Pine Hills

Milwaukee’s greens are great, but Pine Hills’ greens are amazing. Pine Hills’ green complexes are just more interesting to me, and with much more break.

Take the par three 5th hole. This is a long, uphill shot that feels attainable because the green is so massive in size. Get up there, though, and the green surface is ribboned like the waves of nearby Lake Michigan.

The large, wild green on the par three 5th at Pine Hills

Clubhouse & Amenities: Milwaukee

Milwaukee has one of the most memorable clubhouses I’ve ever seen. While the men’s locker room facility is in the style of an old German beer hall, the principal dining and social areas are stately and well-appointed. I attend several annual events there and their food and beverage service is fantastic.

Pine Hills’ food and beverage is outstanding, too, but the edge – by an edge – goes to Milwaukee mostly based on uniqueness.

Milwaukee Country Club’s plantation-style clubhouse

Conclusion:

That I go back and forth between Milwaukee and Pine Hills says it all. Both courses are beautiful and feature tremendous Golden Age design and aesthetics.

If I could help it, I would never turn down the opportunity to play either of them, and both are shining examples of our state’s best golf.

I’m not saying Pine Hills should be ranked the number one private course in Wisconsin, but it should absolutely be considered and I hope it starts seeing a lot of positive pub in the years to come.

I’m expecting a few “you’re crazies” and would love to hear others’ thoughts, so please feel free to leave them in the comments below.

GolfCourseArchitecture.net’s Richard Humphreys posted an article last month about upcoming renovations at one of my favorite golf courses, Pine Hills Country Club in Sheboygan.

Link to article:
Drew Rogers Begins Work at ‘Extraordinary’ Pine Hills in Wisconsin

USGCA Architect Drew Rogers, also on the back end of a terrific restoration project at the Donald Ross designed Kenosha Country Club, is partnering with Pine Hills to help enact a series of small projects they anticipate will have long-lasting positive impacts.

Tree removal, bunker placements, tee boxes, drainage and green surrounds are all on the docket to be addressed.

Some lighter aspects of the renovation work have begun, and deforestation is set to begin this Fall on the course’s closing hole. Rogers’ plans for the 18th should take it from being Pine Hills’ weakest hole to potentially being one of its best (a bold statement on a property like PHCC!).

The 18th already has an excellent green complex, but its current layout doesn’t fit the rest of the course – especially to end the round. As it is, the 18th features a tight, restrictive right-to-left tee shot between trees that leaves a mid-iron approach to a really tough, elevated green.

It’s a very penal hole on a course that’s much better characterized as fun and imaginative.

By removing the woods inside the dogleg, repositioning the tees and making other small adjustments, the new 18th will open up views of a deep hillside ridge that lines the hole’s entire left border and in effect creates a thrilling right-to-left risk/reward opportunity.

This new Cape Hole (a CB Macdonald template design that originated at the National Golf Links of America) will urge players to bite off as much as they can of the ridge to leave a shorter approach shot to the green.

Like the rest of the course, it will be beautiful and dramatic – adjectives more befitting a great finishing hole than penal and restrictive.

Pine Hills’ / Drew Rogers’ plans for the renovated 18th at Pine Hills:

Plans for renovating the 18th hole at Pine Hills, to be started this Fall
(Graphic by Drew Rogers and courtesy of Pine Hills Country Club)

The new Cape will become the second half of a unique and dynamic back-to-back risk/reward left-to-right then right-to-left combination of holes.

While the 17th requires a risky faded tee shot to leave wedge in, the 18th will set up for a draw. Both will demand execution and will put golf balls, and high scores, in jeopardy.

Pine Hills is already a really special golf course, and I’ve flip-flopped on it and Milwaukee being my number one private course in the state for years, to the point that I basically consider them 1-A and 1-B.

So what will high-impact renovations mean to a course that’s already as ‘extraordinary’ as Pine Hills?

For one thing, I think we’ll finally start hearing about this exceptional 92-year-old Sheboygan golf course outside of post-round discussions at the bar or fire pit. I think it should also get a shot in the arm from golfers traveling to Sheboygan for next year’s 2021 Ryder Cup at Whistling Straits.

But will these changes and more attention be the catalyst that elevates the club toward the state and national notoriety a course of its caliber deserves?

I’ll examine that in an upcoming post, including where I think Pine Hills can and should fit in to state and national rankings as well as how I think it compares to and against Wisconsin’s perennially top ranked private club, Milwaukee CC.

One of two Donald Ross designed golf courses in the state of Wisconsin, Kenosha Country Club boasts an almost 100-year-old private course with a rather unique variety of hole layouts, thoughtful use of elevation and fun, tiny [but expanding] green complexes that my host, Gregg, described perfectly as “playful.”

This was my first ever round on a Donald Ross design, and since playing I’ve found myself thinking a lot about it: Different options off its tees (I’d definitely change how I played 15!), how different pin locations could dramatically change several holes, how I could have optimized where I left my bag around certain greens, how I’d love to have both those restrictive tee shots on two, three, five, ten, eleven and fifteen, as well as those “Swing as hard as I can in the right general direction” shots on six, seven, twelve, thirteen and sixteen to look forward to again…

Basically, how Kenosha Country Club is the kind of golf course that would really grow on you.

KCC is a great everyday golf club. Its holes are laid out with terrific variety, allowing players to wail away at will then reining them back in. It’s perfectly walkable with short transfers between greens and tees, and the green complexes are really interesting.

It’s an easy walk minus a few steep hills, but for the most part the hills can be climbed without your full bag (grab your driver or next club selection before walking uphill on 3, 5 and 14, for example, and leave the rest of your equipment to grab on the way down).

Originally designed and opened for play in 1921, Kenosha Country Club has experienced a lot of the same changes and challenges as many other Golden Age golf courses.

1921 Donald Ross layout for Kenosha Country Club (courtesy of the Donald Ross Web Library)

It started with a great strategic design (above) by a master at his craft, Donald Ross, and over time matured and morphed in to something different, albeit recognizable. It’s how recognizable it is compared to its originally designed intentions that’s helping make its current and next steps truly special.

A return to its roots

Kenosha Country Club has been working with ASGCA architect J. Drew Rogers since 2015 to help undo some of the changes that have happened both naturally and intentionally over the last 99 years.

Chief among these updates are significant tree removal, realignment of fairways, recovery of bunkers that have been filled in, and – most importantly if you ask me – a reclamation of green surfaces that have shrunken over time.

Evidence of these green surface changes can be found across the course today. Blue/green dots outline where putting surfaces will be re-expanded to, and it’s easy to picture the positive impact that will be made by recouping so much short grass.

The green on ten, for example, will be expanded to include high slopes on either side that were meant to help push balls toward the center of the green, protecting its outside pins.

Approach shot on the dogleg right par four 10th at Kenosha

Some greens’ redemptive surfaces are less structural (not re-incorporating humps or slopes, for example), but their impact when expanded will be immeasurable through the addition of pinnable areas.

For several holes on the course, it’s that adding of pinnable space that will make all the difference. The par three 17th, for example, can now only be pinned in the upper-right. Surely this was not Ross’s original intent, but it is a natural and unfortunate by-product of golf course evolution.

The uphill par three 17th at Kenosha CC, pinned back-right

Most putting surfaces will be moved out a few feet in each direction, which will be very noticeable on a course with such small greens.

The course and a few of my favorite holes

The smallest of the greens at Kenosha Country Club is on the short, way uphill par three 3rd. I wish I would have walked the length and width of this green, because if I had to guess from memory and photos I’d say it’s 40′ x 20′, and probably 30-40′ uphill.

It is just a 130-yard shot, though, and it was my first birdie of the day, so I thought the small green size fit the hole just right.

The tremendously uphill par three 3rd and its tiny green at Kenosha Country Club

We let the threesome behind us play through on three, and one of their guys went left of the traps off the tee. His only option was a flop shot over the back-left trap to a downhill green running hard away. Not easy, and understandable that he left it short and ended up in his pocket.

Uphill approach shots are a key trend at Kenosha Country Club, and the third is the first hole there where elevation could alter club selection by several clubs.

Other holes that play several clubs longer because of elevation changes include the par four 5th, par four 11th, par four 13th, par four 15th and the previously mentioned par three 17th.

The par four 5th at KCC plays high-low-high across a valley
Back tee boxes on the beautiful par four 11th at KCC, suggesting a draw
Approach shot from the fairway on the par four 13th at KCC
A view from atop the tiny green on the par four 13th
The challenging, uphill par three penultimate hole at Kenosha (17th)

While it’s unusual to see more than one hole on a golf course with such a dramatic low-to-high difference in elevation approaching the green, it simply works at KCC.

In general, Ross’s use of the terrain at Kenosha is thoughtful and aesthetically pleasing. Starring in this category is the all-world par four 15th.

Drew Rogers calls the 15th at Kenosha one of Ross’s all-time greatest hole designs (Ross is accredited with designing ~ 400 courses, by the way), and it’s easy to see why.

There are options galore off this tee. My host hit a wedge safely in front of the river. I elected, twice, to hit driver from the elevated tee boxes, with a wind coming in and to our right. I put two balls well over the trees on to the highway, then – feeling lucky to have avoided hitting anything –

Tee shot on the magnificent par four 15th at Kenosha CC
A look back toward the tee on 15 at Kenosha

Fifteen was the hole I wanted most to get drone photography of. Unfortunately, though, a massive storm hit about 20 minutes after our round and I was ushered back to the clubhouse before I got that far out. I’m definitely hoping to get aerial footage the next time I visit Kenosha, though.

While there are quite a few holes at Kenosha Country Club that feature uphill approach shots, there are also downhill approach shots that must be negotiated on the par four 7th, par four 9th, par three 14th and par four 18th.

The downhill par three 14th at KCC

The finishing holes on each nine are great round enders. Both are significantly downhill with really well protected greens.

The eighteenth has a terraced fairway that if hit well off the tee should leave just a short iron or wedge to get home:

Approach shot from the top terrace of the fairway on 18 at KCC
A look back over the par four 18th at Kenosha Country Club

The ninth is similarly as good, and challenging, to close out the front nine. A view from its higher fairway:

The par four 9th at Kenosha is a challenging end to the front nine

Probably my favorite green on the course is on the par four seventh.

The par four 7th at Kenosha, as seen from above
The extremely canted left-to-right green on 7

Gregg played this half-punch bowl green perfectly, hitting a long approach shot all the way to the left side and watching it climb the edges, roll toward the back and then back around toward the right-middle hole location.

I saw that and was excited for my turn, which was a short approach shot under 100 yards from the right side of the fairway. I wanted to play the same angle and enjoy the view as it filtered toward the hole.

Then, I pushed it right of the flag and in to a small collection area off the back-right of the green. That was a swing I’d love to get back.

Summary

As I said, this is the kind of golf course I could play every day. The fairways are forgiving enough that it won’t overly penalize players for having a bad driving day; the greens and hole layouts, in general, are varied and fun, and it would be a terrific walk that won’t completely wear you out.

Kenosha Country Club is a prime example of a Golden Age course that’s getting better and better over time. Even visiting on a Monday afternoon, the course was active with men and women of all age groups. They obviously have a very avid golfing membership, and one that is in growth mode having added over 50 new members in 2020.

While part of their single-year growth is likely because of the COVID-19 pandemic and folks needing something to do and be a part of, I’m sure the majority of it can be attributed to the excitement building around a course and membership that’s receiving new life through the returns from its investments – a revival in design and architecture that will once again see Kenosha Country Club played as one of the game’s all-time greatest designers meant for it to be played.

Course Wrap-Up:
Location: Kenosha, WI
Yardage: Blue-6530, White-6277, Gold-5680, Red-5107
Slope/Rating: Blue-130/71.9, White-127/70.8, Gold-122/67.9, Red-121/69.4
Par: 70

Kenosha Country Club Website

It was a familiar feeling, and one I’ve come to chase over the years while being blessed to play some of the country’s great golf courses. It was that feeling when, despite high expectations, you’re blown away by a golf course that’s unfolding in front of you.

My expectations were surpassed quickly and often at the new Club at Lac La Belle outside Oconomowoc, Wisconsin.

Course Architect Craig Haltom has been a veritable Swiss Army knife of the golf industry throughout the years, having risen to the role of President at Oliphant Golf Management in his time with the company since 2001.

Still, many know his name for having found the land and introducing Mike Keiser to what has become Sand Valley Golf Resort in Rome, Wisconsin. Craig still serves as Construction Lead for new projects there, but until now hadn’t had the opportunity to both design and build a full golf course.

Having earned his Masters of Landscape Architecture from Heriot-Watt University in Scotland, Craig spent years studying the great courses of Great Britain and Ireland, and while I have not been across the pond I can see from pictures there that his passion for European-style golf is on display at La Belle.

Rich in history dating back to 1896, Haltom was able to take something very old in Oconomowoc and not only make it new but completely unrecognizable from what it was… And unique compared to everything else in the area.

The new Club at Lac La Belle is bold and memorable. It meshes Mammoth Dunes-like green complexes with a beautiful, parkland-esque layout.

Thoughts like “Whoa, that’s so good,” and “This does not feel like Wisconsin,” and “This green is insane – I love what he did with [this] slope” popped in my head constantly. I had to apologize a number of times to my buddy Jeff for all the over-the-top commentary.

Simply put, I was in awe of what Craig Haltom and the Morse family have created at The Club at Lac La Belle.

They have successfully and simultaneously developed a golfing experience that is top-end and extremely unique to the area while paying homage to a rich heritage nearly 125 years in the making that originated with US Open champions Alex Smith and Willie Anderson, and fellow champion golfer Robert B. Simpson.

Those were the first three PGA Professionals at what was then the Country Club of Oconomowoc on the same piece of land that now inhabits the CLLL.

The club’s history and the Smith brothers who helped open the site for golf, specifically, intertwines with the history of Carnoustie Golf Links in Scotland. New ownership is even working with Carnoustie and David Mackesey of Diablo CC to put the Smith brothers’ nostalgic equipment and other turn-of-the-20th century artifacts on display at La Belle.

But I’ve written about the history of The Club at Lac La Belle in the past (Course Preview: The Club at Lac La Belle), and I hope you dive down that rabbit’s hole as it’s as rich as any course’s in the Midwest. What I want to touch on now is what The Club at Lac La Belle has become.

There is nothing fully comparable in the state of Wisconsin, and honestly I think it will jump straight in to the top 10 public courses discussion behind the likes of the River course at Blackwolf Run and the Links at Lawsonia, but ahead of or among [mostly top 100 nationally ranked] courses like SentryWorld, the Irish at Whistling Straits, Meadow Valleys at Blackwolf Run, the Bull at Pinehurst Farms, University Ridge and Wild Rock.

Random thoughts during my round:

  • The course design is unique and really fun
  • The Club at Lac La Belle will feature prominently in the “Best Renovations” category
  • Wide and forgiving fairways
  • These greens are massive! Only in-state comps are Mammoth Dunes, Blue Mound, Lawsonia Links for some
  • The bunkering stars – from the Ohio Best white sand to the natural fescue outcroppings, they’re really beautiful
  • I can’t believe they created this out of Rolling Hills (and what the hell happened to all those trees!?)
  • The Rivalry Pub, patio areas, short game practice area, events & wedding venues, and the pro shop are all really nicely appointed
  • Merchandising akin to Bandon Dunes and Sand Valley
  • Love the logo
  • Incredibly friendly staff – everyone’s very helpful, especially Patrick
  • So many wow moments on the course
  • Green contouring favors players with course/local knowledge – eg: The par three 8th green, bank shots found on other short holes
  • When these sand-based greens are sped up, false fronts could get really crazy
  • Love the drivable par fours, risk/reward opportunities
  • The par 3’s are masterful, and the 4th might be one of my all-time favorites
  • The par 5’s are gettable, especially the course’s signature 16th hole
  • The 18th green is incredible – I love a good punch bowl
  • Don’t go in the left-most fairway bunker on 2
  • I need to buy more batteries for my drone – 3 was not enough here
  • The memorabilia they have on property from Carnoustie is very cool – I held the mashie of a 4-time US Open champion, for example
  • This would be a fun course to chase the sun on, then spend time with cocktails betting over putts on the Himalayas / Punch Bowl-like putting course outside the Rivalry Pub

I could go on, and I’m sure I will in future posts about the Club at Lac La Belle, but the point I want to get across is that their opening week (this weekend, starting Saturday June 20) is a big day for golf in Southeastern Wisconsin.

With a price tag just under $100 including cart, the new Club at Lac La Belle is the best course in the area not named Erin Hills, and I think it is the perfect complement to Erin Hills for out-of-towners looking for a second round without breaking the bank.

A few of my favorite holes:
The par four second is a wonderful strategic golf hole on land new to the Club at Lac La Belle. The tee shot is between trees to an area littered with sand traps – the smart play is short of them to set up a short approach shot, but what fun would that be? This multi-tiered green will be diabolical when fully grown in.

Tee shot on the par four 2nd hole from the ground (construction golf)
Tee shot on the par four 2nd at the Club at Lac La Belle (construction golf)
Tee shot landing area on the par four 2nd
A close-up of the green on two – avoid that short-left trap off the tee, trust me

I first visited The University Club (fka Tripoli) three years ago with Golf Course Architect Andy Staples (link to original article). Andy had been hired to put together a 10-year strategic plan for renovating the now 99-year-old course: Updates that will help usher the club in to and beyond it’s centennial anniversary.

The University Club has a rich history, having played host to the 1956-1960 Miller Opens (video below from the year Ken Venturi won in 1957) and the 1970-1971 Greater Milwaukee Opens, won by players like Venturi, Cary Middlecoff and Gene Littler.

Video highlights from the 1957 Miller Open

Recent Renovations:
Starting with a terrific competition golf course and outstanding facilities/amenities, Staples’ work and suggestions have been far from a total redo.

Heightened private club competition on the north side of Milwaukee, though, meant critical changes needed to be made to address a few quirks and especially upgrade the club’s practice facilities.

The previous practice facilities consisted of a tight chute of land between N 43rd Street and the first tee with a handful of hitting spaces. It’s a small area that allows players to work out some kinks before teeing off, but little else.

Enter Staples, who is highly regarded for his practice facility expertise (link to portfolio), and enter a strategic partnership between the University Club and the Marquette University Men’s Golf Team.

This joint venture worked with Staples to upgrade the U-Club’s practice facilities significantly, including designated short game areas, practice greens (one perfectly level to practice speed and line), a competition wedge range with cement targets (to sound when hit) and a 4-hole practice course.

Level and uneven lies, uphill and downhill shots, required lobs, awkward sand shots, approaches from fairways and long rough can all now be simulated on the 10-acre parcel of land.

Conceptual plan for the new short game practice area (2017)
The new practice facility’s competition wedge range (photo credit: Dylan Hills, University Club of MKE)
4th green on the new short course (photo credit: Dylan Hills, University Club of MKE)
Practice facility short course (photo credit: Dylan Hills, University Club of MKE)

To make room for this state-of-the-art practice facility, some physical changes needed to be made to the golf course.

The par three twelfth was moved from running north-south to east-west, was lengthened slightly and given a terrific green complex that’s modeled after the original twelfth.

Much simpler re-routing was achieved on the tee areas of the thirteenth and sixteenth holes, helping create more well-defined fairways and, in the case of the sixteenth, a safer golf experience.

Significant tree removal has been undertaken (and is still underway) across the property, some mowing lines have been adjusted and numerous forward tees have been added.

The Course:
The University Club is not an overpoweringly long course on the scorecard, tipping out at 6,588 yards and with blue tees at 6,269, but it plays significantly longer. The back nine, especially, features a tremendously challenging stretch of holes from twelve to sixteen.

None are more challenging than the par four sixteenth, which regained its bite and now fully earns its number one handicapped hole status.

The par threes are mostly on the shorter side, which I appreciate at a classic course with tough greens.

The new twelfth is the longest of the four and is unquestionably the hardest. It plays about 200 yards slightly uphill, regularly in to the wind and to a fairly narrow, well-protected green.

The new par three 12th at The University Club

The great green complexes at The U-Club start right out of the gate on the first hole. A downhill drive from the clubhouse to a tree-lined fairway, this raised Bendelow putting surface is nicely canted back-to-front:

Hole 1: Par 4 (386/373/364/364)

The second is where players start to see noticeable updates from the renovation. This area, running parallel to Good Hope Road, includes the second hole fairway and its green surrounds, the sixteenth tee area and the twelfth hole.

It’s not often I re-post press releases on my site, but this one’s special to me as it pertains to the Head PGA Golf Professional at our home club, North Hills CC in Menomonee Falls, Eddie Terasa.

I’ve had the pleasure of playing a number of rounds with Eddie since I first joined North Hills in 2013. I’ve never seen a smoother, more consistent swing or approach to the game of golf.

Congratulations, Eddie, on being named the PGA Wisconsin Section’s Senior Player of the Decade!

WISCONSIN GOLF PROFESSIONALS HELMINEN AND TERASA EARN PLAYER OF THE DECADE HONORS

West Allis, WI (April 30, 2020) – The Wisconsin Professional Golfers’ Association (WPGA) announces Players of the Decade. Earning the prestigious honor for the decade spanning 2010-2019 are Ryan Helminen, PGA of Ridgeway Country Club (Neenah) in the member race and Eddie Terasa, PGA of North Hills Country Club (Menomonee Falls) in the senior race. 

“Helminen’s journey to the member honor featured ten years of consistently great play,” said Joe Stadler, Executive Director Wisconsin PGA / WPGA Junior Foundation. “Terasa’s senior resume during the ten years was just as impressive as Helminen’s on the member side with an impressive list of major tournament victories over the course of this 10-year stretch.” 

Photo courtesy of PGA of America

The process for determining these awards is based on a point system with players receiving points on how each individual finished in the Player of the Year standings annually from 2010-2019. On a yearly basis the system provides certain point values to each of the top twenty players in the member contest and the top ten players in the senior contest.

Player of the Decade – MEMBER
Ryan Helminen’s Journey

In the past decade, Appleton-native Helminen has won the WPGA Member Player of the Year award five times, finished second twice and finished third twice. These finishes helped him earn 213 points and win the award by an impressive 55-point margin. Highlights during Helminen’s run included the 2014 Wisconsin State Open Title, four WPGA Professional Championship victories and seven one-day WPGA Classic wins. Helminen has been a Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) member since 2007. He will be recognized at an upcoming WPGA Tournament. 

“Being a member of the WPGA is a great honor and I feel very privileged to be a part of it,” said Helminen, PGA Teaching Professional at Ridgeway Country Club. “The opportunity to have been able to compete on all our wonderful courses is very much appreciated. I look forward to the new decade and the challenge of continuing to have success in our great game, in our great state.”

Player of the Decade – SENIOR
Eddie Terasa’s Journey

Madison-native Terasa turned 50-years-old in June 2010 entering him into the senior standings for the upcoming decade. Just one year later Terasa started a run of four consecutive years of achieving the Senior Player of the Year Award. Terasa’s list of victories included the 2010 Wisconsin State Open, 2010 WPGA Match Play Championship, 2016 Wisconsin State Senior Open, two WPGA Professional Championships (2011 & 2013), and three WPGA Senior Professional Championships (2011, 2013 & 2014). Terasa has been a PGA member since 1987. The WPGA acknowledged Terasa as the Senior Player of the Decade at the WPGA Spring Membership Meeting Reception held on March 2, 2020 at the Radisson Hotel & Conference Center in Green Bay. 

“It’s all about the journey,” said Terasa, Head PGA Professional of North Hills Country Club. “I enjoy competing with my fellow PGA friends. The awards and accolades are the cherry on top.”

Last week, Governor Evers extended his “Safer at Home” order for the state of Wisconsin through May 26.

While frustration was nearly audible throughout closed down communities, there was at least one piece of positive news that came with it: Golf courses are permitted to open, with serious restrictions, on Friday, April 24.

The 24th is tomorrow, and while it won’t be golf as usual, at least it’s golf. Besides, players aren’t complaining as tee sheets across the Milwaukee area are filling up quickly.

Most courses are just about booked solid for tomorrow, and many through the weekend. Some courses, like Lawsonia, are spreading out tee times as much as 20 minutes, although the average is closer to 12-15. Long intervals between tee times should help with social distancing, and should also help keep play moving.

So what will be different about golf in the time of Coronavirus?

Alcohol and food / beverage sales will not be allowed, in general, and on-course amenities like scorecards and tees, ball washers, bottled water and in many cases even garbage cans will be noticeably gone.

There will be a foam insert in the cups that rises an inch over the hole or rests an inch below it and will not allow the flags to be removed. As many common touch points as possible will be eliminated.

Foam pool noodle cut off ~ 1″ below rim of cup

Most courses have included their adapted rules in pushed emails this week, but Oshkosh Country Club’s message about updated rules and regulations seemed to be the most succinct and universal:

Covid-19 Rules and Regulations:

  1. The use of golf carts is prohibited.
  2. Social Distancing Requirements must be observed at all times, unless the players reside in the same living unit or household.
  3. All tee times and payments must be made in advance online or by phone.
  4. Clubhouses and pro shops must remain closed.
  5. Tee times must be spaced to avoid multiple foursomes from clustering or gathering at any stage of the course.
  6. Driving ranges and miniature golf must remain closed.
  7. Sales of beer, liquor and food are prohibited.
  8. Water is NOT available on the course
  9. Flag sticks and Cups will be placed 1” above the ground.

A list of known rates for Milwaukee area courses that will be open tomorrow:

Blackstone Creek (Germantown): 18 holes-$40, 9 holes-$25
Broadlands (North Prairie): 18 holes-$38.50, 9 holes-$20
Edgewood (Big Bend): 18 holes-$24, 9 holes-$16
Fairways of Woodside (Sussex): 18 holes-$40, 9 holes-$25
Fire Ridge (Grafton): 18 holes-$45, 9 holes-$25
Ironwood (Lisbon): 18 holes-$36, 9 holes-$21
Kettle Hills (Richfield): 18 holes-$29
The Golf Courses at Lawsonia (Green Lake): 18 holes-$40, 9 holes-$25
MorningStar (Waukesha): 18 holes-$59, 9 holes-$34
The Oaks (Cottage Grove): 18 holes-$39, 9 holes-$25
Oshkosh Country Club (now semi-private): 18 holes-$45, 9 holes-$25
Pewaukee GC (Pewaukee): 18 holes-$40, 9 holes-$25
Scenic View (Slinger): 18 holes-$40, 9 holes-$25
Silver Spring (Menomonee Falls): 18 holes-$40, 9 holes-$25
Songbird Hills (Hartland): 18 holes: $19.50, 9 holes-$11.50
The Bog (Saukville): 18 holes-$65, 9 holes-$40
Western Lakes (Pewaukee): 18 holes-$23, 9 holes-$15
Wild Rock (Wisconsin Dells): 18 holes-$40, 9 holes-$25
Wild Rock, Woods Course (Wisconsin Dells): 9 holes-$15

Waukesha county courses:
Moor Downs (Waukesha): 18 holes-$16, 9 holes-$13
Wanaki (Menomonee Falls): 18 holes-$31, 9 holes-$19
Nagawaukee (Pewaukee): 18 holes-$34.50, 9 holes-$21.50

Milwaukee county courses:
Brown Deer (Milwaukee): 18 holes-$32, 9 holes-$20
Dretzka, Whitnall, Oakwood (Milwauee): 18 holes-$20, 9 holes-$11
Currie, Grant, Greenfield (Milwaukee): 18 holes-$18, 9 holes-$11
Lincoln (Milwaukee): 9 holes-$11

At the risk of sounding preachy…

As we embark on this new world of restricted golf, I want you all to understand that there are people in the community who think it’s unfair we’re allowed to play our favorite hobby while the rest of the state is quarantined in their homes.

I get it.

I’ve been at home with my wife and kids for a month and a half straight and we’re all getting stir crazy as we do our part to flatten the curve and change the narrative on COVID-19.

While I’m not the kind of person who’d report others for slipping up, I know there are people just waiting for it to happen so they can jump all over them.

That said, I implore you all to use common sense on the course. Practice social distancing and please do your part to avoid shining a negative light on the entire golfing community. There are a whole lot of people with a whole lot of nothing to do, and it can truly take one or two idiots to screw up everything for all of us.

Consider what happened in Illinois: The morning after courses were allowed to open, ~ 300 players showed up at the same Chicago course, at the same time, and practiced zero social distancing. As you’d guess, their golfing privileges are gone.

While it may not seem like it, getting to golf during a national quarantine is a privilege that just might help save some of our sanity and potentially course owners’ businesses. So, for both avid golfers’ sanity and for the great people whose livelihood rely on golf being able to be played, let’s not be like Illinois.

We’re going to get through this Coronavirus pandemic and, like you, I can’t wait to return to playing our great game again soon. More than anything, though, I can’t wait to get back to a somewhat normal life [and golf] sometime in 2020.

Wishing all of you and your families good health and safety during these scary times. Again, don’t be like Illinois 🙂

The recently announced end to the ban on golfing breathed much needed hope in to Wisconsin golfers, who have otherwise been dealing with a generally cold, wet Spring and Governor Evers’ “Safer-at-Home” order while we all do our part to flatten the curve of the Coronavirus pandemic.

To say there hasn’t been much to look forward to would be an understatement. One thing I’ve been really looking forward to, though, is my new golf bag: The Vessel Player 2.0 stand bag.

My new Vessel Player 2.0 golf bag

While not yet a household name, regular watchers of the PGA and LPGA Tour have seen Vessel’s products… a lot.

The top luxury bag brand on Tour, customized Vessel bags are used by the likes of Jordan Spieth, Tiger Woods, Rickie Fowler, Bryson DeChambeau, Steve Stricker, Patrick Reed and about 30 others, not to mention Michelle Wie and 38 other LPGA players and another 100 male and female Tour pros who use Vessel’s stock models. Steph Curry, Michael Phelps and other celebs who value sleek looks combined with unmatched quality and customization also tote Vessel bags.

But probably their most high-profile commission was for the 2019 President’s Cup at Royal Melbourne (link: Vessel Goes to the 2019 President’s Cup in Australia). These bags were awesome!

Vessel’s custom US & International team bags for the 2019 President’s Cup

I was first introduced to Vessel at the 2018 PGA Merchandise Show in Orlando, where I spent at least 30 minutes gawking at their staff, cart and stand options.

From premium-quality microsuede-backed synthetic leather, to durable weatherproof zippers, premium leather handles and purpose-built functionality that’s “Filled with purpose,” Vessel bags have all the look and feel of a true premium brand.

It’s that purpose-built functionality that I love most about my new bag: Convenience, comfort, security and good looks all come together seamlessly.

The straps rest comfortably across my neck and shoulders. A magnetic tees / rangefinder pocket keeps on-course tools quickly accessible while not requiring constant zipping and unzipping, and a pocket-inside-pocket lockable valuables pouch makes almost too much sense.

“Filled with purpose” goes beyond golf bags, too. For every Vessel bag purchased, the company donates a school backpack to a child in need. My bag, labeled 56479, represents a whole lot of good deeds on the company’s behalf.

Vessel’s mission, likewise, is sewn in to each bag and is a breath of fresh air for the soul:

Inspired by love
Intentionally designed
Handcrafted to perfection
Made for a unique mission
One that only you can fulfill

Life is an adventure
Experience it to the utmost
Carry what you treasure
Reach out eagerly and without fear
Become who you were created to be

You are a Vessel
Filled with Purpose

Sign me up. I’m bought in and already have luggage and a duffel on order.

Vessel’s mission statement, stitched in to each bag

Because of the “Safer-at-Home” order and its coinciding ban on golf, I haven’t had a chance to put my new bag to the test on the course yet. So rather than fully reviewing it from experience, I’ll touch on my perceptions as they pertain to four key features of golf bags: Storage and features, durability, weight and carriage, and options and customization.

Storage and Features
The Player 2.0 has some really smart features that I’ve never seen on other bags. Two of these that I really like are the hidden lockable valuables pouch and the magnetic range finder / tees pocket.

Located above the central belly panel, the magnetic pouch holds strong while opening and closing with ease and is sizable enough for a range finder and other odds and ends. This is a really cool feature.

The valuables pocket is a waterproof pouch located inside the garment pocket, providing a secure space for wallets, rings and so on, and includes a hanging lock.

The Player 2.0 is available in a 6-way or 14-way configuration. I chose 6-way as when I’m practicing I like to bring an extra club or two (usually both woods and a 1-iron, for example, or sometimes an extra wedge).

The cooler pouch is another nice feature. Most bags these days have a cooler pocket, but Vessel’s feels more substantial and is perfect for holding a water bottle.

There is a nice video on the Player 2.0’s product page, linked here:

Link to product overview video for Vessel Player 2.0 stand bag

Durability
One of the problem areas with every golf bag I’ve used (other than my Seamus Fescue Project Sunday bag, which I use only during ideal weather conditions) is the zippers. Inevitably, standard zippers rust, snag and even crack.

While my Player 2.0 bag has not been exposed to any elements yet, there is a noticeable difference in the quality of the YKK waterproof zippers they use compared to anything else I’ve used, and I expect them to hold up well.

The Player 2.0 utilizes microsuede-backed synthetic leather (a very high-quality microfiber), which is an ideal material for long-lasting golf bags. Even colored white [and meant to be used outdoors], the fabric is known for its abrasion, fade and heat resistance, toughness and cleanability.

The Player 2.0 also now features carbon fiber legs. I’m guessing they probably won’t withstand my golf cart’s wheels (like my old Sun Mountain bag’s didn’t when I backed over it in the garage – not the bag’s fault, obviously!), but they should be as or more durable than anything else on the market.

Weight and Carriage
At 5.7 pounds, the Player 2.0 is about a pound and a half heavier than Vessel’s Lite Stand model, and within the acceptable range for a light-weight carry bag.

The two-way, interchangeable straps are soft and feature an eight-point pivot to provide an extraordinarily comfortable carry.

The Player 2.0’s 8-way pivot point for carrying straps

Options and Customization
If you don’t find exactly what you like in their stock bags, Vessel has a comprehensive custom bag process that I recommend playing around with online:

Link to Vessel’s custom bags process

Basically everything aesthetic is customizable (including 22 colors and 7 material types for 3 different sections of the Player 2.0, for example; logos and embroidery can also be added).

Even though he uses all black, Stephen Curry’s bag is a terrific example of what can be done through Vessel’s custom bag process (Golf Digest link: Stephen Curry’s Got a Brand New Golf Bag — and it’s Straight Fire):

Stephen Curry’s custom Vessel Player stand golf bag

Product Overview:
Brand: Vessel
Model: Player 2.0 stand bag
Base Price: $345
Website: https://vesselbags.com/collections/stand-bags/products/player-2-0-stand-bag

Located just 45 miles west of Chicago, outside of Aurora, is a little slice of Heaven developed by attorney and real estate developer, Vince Solano, Jr.

One of four men’s only clubs in the state of Illinois (which makes up about a fifth to sixth of the total in the US), Solano developed Black Sheep to provide its membership a true home-away-from-home, with a comfortable but well-appointed, functional open clubhouse with a locker room, pro shop and a great room / bar area. It has everything it needs, and little it doesn’t.

There is no pool. No tennis courts. No dining room. No dress code.

There are no menus and no kitchen. The dining options are burger or chicken sandwich from the grill out back, or their famous peanut butter and jalapeno sandwich (there may have been a few pre-made options in the refrigerator that I missed).

There is no waitstaff. In fact, there are very few employees, in general, although those who are there including PGA Head Golf Professional Kevin Healy are tremendously helpful and accommodating, and will help throughout the clubhouse.

Black Sheep: One of the best logos in golf

All of this adds up to an intimate experience with low overhead. That means members get an elite, top-100 club with the lowest dues of any private course in the Chicago area (just over $7k/year, although initiation is ~ $35k), no food and beverage minimums, and no reliance on outside cash flow. With no need to host outside events on Mondays, for example, the course is open to membership seven days a week.

Black Sheep has 27 holes of fantastic David Esler designed golf that ebbs and inhales across a vast 285 acres of Illinois prairie land.

The holes Esler laid out will test every club in the bag, and will reward players who can pull off drawn and cut shot shapes while allowing for straight and steady play down its forgiving fairways.

The golf course at Black Sheep is one of the best competition courses I’ve ever played.

In fact, it played host this day to our 2019 Illinois vs. Wisconsin Writer’s Cup match.

An early morning view of the remote Black Sheep Golf Club from high above the clubhouse
Aerial view of the par four tenth at Black Sheep Golf Club

The first and tenth holes tee off adjacent to the clubhouse, but while the first hole heads west, the tenth leads players downhill and to the north.

A look back at the clubhouse from beyond the tenth hole green site

One of my favorite holes on the course is the lightning bolt shaped par five 11th. The fairway runs out from the tee, and helped turbo-charge my 275-ish yard drive well over 300.

Tee shot on the long, three-shot par five 11th at Black Sheep

Any 200-yard shot at the green in two, though, will need to carry a ton of greenside bunkers and would be ill-advised, at best. There is a ton of room short and left of the green for laying up and leaves a great angle in.

A look at the fairway transition on the par five 11th, from around 260 yards out

The course uses elevation well, especially on the par threes. My favorite is the short 25th, measuring just 135 yards to a postage stamp sized green that slopes hard from back to front.

Rich in history, Blue Mound Golf and Country Club in Wauwatosa is one of the most prestigious and well-respected private clubs in the state of Wisconsin.

Designed by one of the world’s all-time greatest golf course architects, Seth Raynor, Blue Mound originally opened for play in 1926 and is one of only four courses in the state to have hosted a major golf tournament.

Bronze bust of Seth Raynor near the 1st tee at Blue Mound Golf & Country Club

They probably have the most legendary winner, too: Gene Serazen at the inaugural 1933 PGA Championship:

Gene Sarazen winning the 1st PGA Championship in 1933 at Blue Mound

History aside (I added a full list of Wisconsin major tournament sites, years and winners toward the bottom of this post), the team and membership at Blue Mound should be proud of the way they’ve shepherded it in recent years. Anyone even adjacent to the golf industry has noticed the tremendous challenges Golden Age courses have faced, including but not limited to:

  • Endlessly fighting the results of excessive post-war tree planting (and now the Emerald ash borer)
  • Resisted some, and allowed then peeled back other 1990’s-era updates
  • Surviving and recovering from the ensuing financial collapse
  • Refocused on their rich heritage and invested in a future that includes strategic restorations and property enhancements

Continually doing all of this and more have brought Blue Mound full circle to where things began in 1926, with a…

Perfectly maintained golf course with superior design elements and the state’s best greens.

Anyone could live with that.

Even the first time I played it this year, following a few days that stockpiled over three inches of rain (you can see some still standing in bunkers), Blue Mound’s course conditions were better and faster than expected.

That said, the conditions the second time I played it were off-the-charts good. The fairways were spry and ran out, and the greens were just perfect.

No area course has better, more interesting green complexes than Blue Mound, and only Milwaukee CC can stand toe-to-toe with its decorated history and the mystique that coexists at upper-echelon private clubs.

Where does that come from? In the case of Blue Mound, it started and still lives with Raynor.

One of my coworkers who joined us for my first round there enjoys playing golf, but told me afterwards he didn’t follow our conversations about template holes. He especially didn’t understand why the club would want to raise a perfectly good fairway like on the Alps fourth when the hole is fine as is.

I had to admit it’s a geeky golf guy thing that goes against [real] common sense, but I love everything about Golden Age golf and especially when it’s related to Macdonald/Raynor and their template holes. These guys were masters, and that’s proven out over time, course and tournament history. The onus to keep the course within their parameters has long been passed, and Blue Mound has been running in full stride.

Raynor built some beautiful golf holes at Blue Mound, highlighted as I mentioned by incredible green sites. I’ll touch on a few of the most memorable to me here, and will also give a couple general opinions.

The first really remarkable green at Blue Mound is their Double Plateau second. At over 10,300 square feet, this is the largest and most pinnable surface on the entire course with three distinct levels.

Part of the green on the par four Double Plateau 2nd at Blue Mound

While I haven’t had a chance to fly my drone at Blue Mound, @putt4dough24 on Instagram does on a regular basis. I highly recommend following him for great images of Blue Mound and other top national private clubs, including this pic of Blue Mound’s Double Plateau.

Link to @putt4dough24 on Instagram (Blue Mound member, golf/drone photographer)

The first of Blue Mound’s par threes, the third is a terrific Raynor Biarritz. I thought it was interesting at first that they do not mow the first/high shelf section of the green. After doing more research, though, I’ve come to understand that this is how Raynor and Macdonald actually intended it.

The long Biarritz par three 3rd at Blue Mound
View from the back section of the Biarritz 3rd, showing the swale and unmowed front

Most Biarritz-style greens I’ve played were not actually designed by Raynor or Macdonald. The Sandbox at Sand Valley, Old Macdonald, Streamsong Red, Bandon Trails and Sweetgrass all have Biarritz-style greens, for example, but all were designed/implemented by modern day architects.

Shoreacres (Lake Bluff, IL) is the only other true Raynor course I’ve played and, according to Golf Club Atlas and The Fried Egg, is the exception to the rule that the front section of Biarritz greens should be mowed to fairway length. In fact, GCA mentions that the front section of Shoreacres’ Biarritz sixth lacks the cinder subsurface that serves as a base for the rest of the putting surface.

That said, I’d prefer the front section be mowed. There are few shots in golf more fun to watch than when your tee shot hits the front section of a Biarritz green, disappears in to the swale and reemerges rolling toward a back hole location.

My buddy, Greg’s tee shot on the 8th at Old Macdonald, for example (click for video) – a solid 12 seconds of watching the ball fly, run out, climb and curl in.

Greg’s tee shot on the Biarritz-style 8th at Old Macdonald

Some other Biarritz-style greens I’ve played and took pictures of:

The Alps fourth hole is one that may garner interest in the near future because of potential renovation plans. The club is looking at raising the fairway surface near the green to make the approach shot completely blind, like it is on the original Alps hole at Prestwick Golf Club in Scotland.

The par four Alps 4th hole

The seventh at Blue Mound is the course’s Short hole and features one of the property’s prettiest backdrops: Mt. Mary University.

Blue Mound’s downhill Short par three 7th

The eighth is probably the course’s signature hole, featuring a well-elevated Punch Bowl green.

Tee area on Blue Mound’s Punch Bowl 8th
A closer look at the Punch Bowl on 8 at Blue Mound

I love the view from the tee on nine. With the clubhouse as the backdrop, the tee shot needs to carry the deep Ravine the hole is named for. The three fairway bunkers on the right side look gnarly but are not in play for most golfers. The biggest miss to avoid here is anything snappy and left.

The par four Ravine 9th, with a forced carry off the tee

With a back pin location, the green on nine is one of the toughest on the course to get to, but it pales in comparison to the seemingly straight-forward opening hole on the back nine.

Ten, appropriately nicknamed Prize, is a shining example of how an ingenious green complex can make an otherwise innocuous golf hole great.

There is nothing for the golfer to worry about off the tee. Given the size of the green, though, chances are there are at least a few clubs that can provide enough distance but just one that will leave a good chance for a two-putt par.

Tee box on the par four Prize 10th, one of the course’s best competition holes

Featuring one of the most scenic teeing areas on the course, the par four twelfth is the course’s Hog’s Back template.

The tee boxes set up alongside a pond and play to a crested fairway that cants from right to left. Even if just for the views alone, this is a really memorable par four.

Joe’s tee shot on the par four 12th, Hog’s Back
The long par four Hog’s Back 12th from the forward tees

There are actually two standard right-to-left Redan greens at Blue Mound. The first is on the course’s par four opening hole, and the second is this gem that I’d imagine took incredible physical labor to manufacture:

The beautiful Redan par three 13th at Blue Mound

The fun in any of Raynor or Macdonald’s Redan complexes is in the way the right side can be used to influence approach shots toward the middle or back of the putting surface.

The thirteenth has a long, narrow green with an expansive approach area above and short-right of the putting surface to funnel balls greenward.

I can’t imagine the amount of land that was moved to elevate the playing surface here. To illustrate my point, here’s a view of the outside border toward the back-right (from the tees):

The Redan green complex’s dramatic edge on 13

Every great golf course needs a solid finishing hole, and the 18th at Blue Mound is perfect. Measuring 560 yards from the tips, the 18th is by far the longest hole on a par 70 course with just two par fives, and offers ample width off the tee and on subsequent long shots.

The par five Long finishing hole at Blue Mound

Both times playing here I was able to smack a 3-wood as far as I could on the second shot. Neither made the green, but being able to haul off on a long club without worrying too much about tree lines, water or other hazards is good fun and brings strategy in to play. Both times I put myself in no man’s land too close to the green and would have been better off laying up to a more comfortable distance with a full wedge, but that’s not quite as satisfying.

As with the rest of the course, Blue Mound is all about the second shot and putting. And the true genius in CB Macdonald and Seth Raynor’s work can be found in the give and take. While there is always a best-case, sporty shot to hit, there’s also one for the smart, consistent player (not me) to count on for a great look at par.

Any ultra-exclusive club is going to have outside naysayers. It’s how the world and people who want to feel important work. Over the past five to ten years, I’ve heard two common negatives about Blue Mound:

  1. Tree removal made the course too easy
  2. The membership is old and stuffy

Having not played Blue Mound previously, I pictured in my mind a landscape as barren as Washington County, or the Links course at Lawsonia… Scorched earth.

I was actually surprised by how many trees do come in to play, and I think if anything they could probably take out more. Their team certainly did not overdo it, though, and any challenge taken away was never intended to be there (by their ingenious course designer) in the first place.

From what I’ve seen, the second generalization is also unfounded. I half-expected to be having lunch and tea in a rollback leather chair with old bronze casters while old men read newspapers in their pajamas all around me, maybe slipping silverware in their pockets when nobody was looking.

In actuality, I’ve played with some really fun younger guys and have met a dozen or so others pre- and post-round by the range, men’s locker room bar and fire pits. I’d be excited to golf with any of them.

From what I’ve seen and heard, the club is getting younger and flourishing, and a bright future is comforting to see at a course so rich with history and charm.

In case you’re wondering about all Wisconsin courses to have hosted major golf tournaments/events (with year(s) and champion(s)), here is the full list:

  • US Open
    • Erin Hills
      • 2017: Brooks Koepka
  • PGA Championship
    • Blue Mound
      • 1933: Gene Sarazen
    • Whisting Straits
      • 2004: Vijay Singh
      • 2010: Martin Kaymer
      • 2015: Jason Day
  • US Senior Open
    • Whistling Straits
      • 2007: Brad Bryant
  • US Amateur
    • Erin Hills and Blue Mound (alternate site for stroke play)
      • 2011: Peter Uihlein
  • Ryder Cup (yes, I’m including it)
    • Whistling Straits
      • 2020: To be decided
  • US Women’s Open
    • Blackwolf Run
      • 1998: Se Ri Pak
      • 2012: Na Yeon Choi

Course Wrap-Up:
Location: Wauwatosa, WI
Yardage: Black-6667, Blue-6313, White-5632
Slope/Rating: Black-131/72.1, Blue-127/70.6, White-124/72.5
Par: 70

Blue Mound Golf and Country Club Website

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