Golf Course Review: Sand Valley, Mammoth Dunes

I have been very fortunate to take part in a handful of Sand Valley media events, and the recent May 1 media day for the opening of the Sandbox was a great one.

Along with playing Bill Coore and Ben Creshaw’s par three course on the day it debuted, we were also treated to a golfing experience that blew my mind: David McLay Kidd’s Mammoth Dunes.

A 6-hole loop was available for preview the last time I was on site, so having the opportunity to see the rest of the project was highly anticipated to say the least. 16 holes were made available to a few of us media guys, which was better than I expected considering the most recent snowfall (a blizzard) was just a week before.

The Wisconsin weather warmed up quickly, though, leaving playable albeit soft and slightly off-colored turf at Mammoth Dunes. I can tell you from experience that this course will green up nicely and will play fast. Really fast.

Growing up in Scotland, David McLay Kidd is the son of long-time Gleneagles course Superintendent, Jimmy Kidd, who taught him all about golf course architecture and conditioning. His fascination with great golf led him to the pursuit of a career in golf design, and things really took off when he partnered with Sand Valley developer Mike Keiser for the flagship course at Bandon Dunes Golf Resort in 1999.

Bandon was the development that changed everything for Keiser, for Kidd, and for the golf industry, and a resort like Sand Valley would never have been possible if it was not for the tremendous success they had there.

Mammoth Dunes is the third course at Sand Valley Golf Resort, and has now been open to the public since May 31. The first course, Sand Valley, debuted last year to great acclaim, paving the way for more championship golf in the prehistoric sand dunes of central Wisconsin.

The land at Mammoth Dunes is more rugged than at its sister course, Sand Valley. There are fewer clean lines and the scale of its features – the fairways, greens, sand blowouts and changes in elevation – are nothing short of mammoth. The scale of this course is staggering; every hole is memorable, every shot makes you think and typically provides at least a couple of options.

I caught myself constantly saying, “Oh wow,” and “Jeez, this is beautiful,” and other equally cheesy and obvious comments that I couldn’t hold back. Mammoth Dunes is an exhilarating, wonderfully pure golfing experience that will quickly take the world of golf by storm.

The opening tee shot is to one of the widest fairways I’ve ever seen – easily 100 yards in width. The green area is mostly without bunkering, but like the majority of the course features mounding that helps or hinders shots played along the ground.

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Hole 1: Par 4 (417/394/358/324/221/198)

A central blowout bunker dictates some of the ground game in the approach area:

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Hole 1: Par 4 (417/394/358/324/221/198)

Hole two is a spectacular par four. A sea of sand lies between the teeing grounds and fairway, lengthening the carry the further right you aim.

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Hole 2: Par 4 (405/402/360/330/286/236)

Keep in mind the fescue turf at Sand Valley plays very, very fast, so expect a lot of run-out when the ball hits the fairway. This should affect your aim as you won’t want to land your drive anywhere near traps like these ones:

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Hole 2: Par 4 (405/402/360/330/286/236)

Kidd’s green on two is all-world – massive in size with spines, valleys and a left-side mound that hides much of its contouring:

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The first par five on the course is a good one. Like on two, make sure to choose the right line over the sand – anything short will leave a tough recovery and a challenge to get to this green in regulation.

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Golf Course Review: The Sandbox at Sand Valley Golf Resort

In Wisconsin, we’re lucky to be in a golf environment that is not just surviving, but thriving. Even though our seasons seem shorter every year, we live in one of the best golf states in the entire country.

2016 saw a record low ten new courses open across the United States. 2017 had several more, but not significantly. Highlighting 2017’s portfolio of new tracks were the flagship design at Sand Valley, Gil Hanse’s Black course at Streamsong Resort, the new AT&T Byron Nelson host Trinity Forest, and the reversible Silvies Valley Ranch in Seneca, Oregon (have you seen the CNN video about their Seamus Goat Division caddie program?).

2018 will see two new courses open in Wisconsin, both at Sand Valley. The first, which opened May 1 and I will be discussing now, is the 17-hole Bill Coore/Ben Crenshaw designed Sandbox. The other new project, of course, will be David McLay Kidd’s massive masterpiece Mammoth Dunes (post upcoming), set to open tomorrow!

A fun and unique golfing experience, the Sandbox serves as an homage to the golden age of golf course design. Green styles that otherwise exist only at North Berwick, the National Golf Links of America, The Old Course at St. Andrews, Shoreacres, Fishers Island, Chicago Golf Club, Old Macdonald at Bandon Dunes Golf Resort (link shows their similar project, Bandon Preserve at BDGR), Lawsonia Links and other [mostly] pre-Depression Era gems can be found on this wonderful short course that measures under 1,700 total yards.

Biarritz, redan, double-plateau, short, Eden, lion’s mouth and other classic greens are not just old in age, but are generally very challenging for the everyday player to get access to. Golfers get to experience those classic designs in the Sandbox, though, neatly packaged in a fun, time-extensive journey that tests golfers’ metal on all manors of awkwardly-distanced tee shots.

Each hole has three sets of tees, sensibly marked by colored sand shovels. The back shovels stand perpendicular to the sandy turf with red handles (the Crenshaw tees – Ben has been long regarded as one of the greatest putters in the history of golf), followed by yellow- (Coore tees) and then blue-handled shovels. The blue tees are meant for putting and/or short chip-and-run opportunities.

Creativity abounds in the Sandbox. While distances max out around 165 yards – most are considerably shorter – many half- and three-quarter-club yardages mean you better have a lot of confidence in distance control… Or be ready to read every single piece of turf leading to the pin.

I will mercifully avoid giving my thoughts on strategy (remember: Those who can’t golf, write about it!). Because I think it’s such a unique golf experience, though, I do want to provide a little about the short course and some of its wonderful nuances.

The 17-hole Sandbox course starts with a fun little downhill par three, measuring 105 yards from the red shovels, 88 from the yellows and 57 from the blues. I was apparently too busy chatting with our hosts and friends to take a picture of it – sorry!

From 145 yards, the second hole is one heck of a test. The entrance to the green is narrow, and large traps pock the front-left and right sides.

As an entirely fescue facility, Sand Valley is built to play fast and furious, so if you ever don’t think you can fly sand traps on any of their courses… Get creative!

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Hole 2: 145/104/51

The third features a green design that is probably one of the most rare in all of golf: The double plateau.

The double plateau requires absolute precision off the tee to hold shots on the correct mound. Hit the opposite side and it’ll be like putting across a deep biarritz.

I love how the double plateau allows a single golf hole to play as many. This green can be set up an endless number of ways to create different par three experiences – from these tees, for example, a high-left pin requires flying the central sand trap while a high-right pin can be played in the air or on the ground.

There are always options at Sand Valley.

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Hole 3: 89/78/46

Walking off the third green, we crisscrossed between the 12th and 13th holes and noticed local legend and two-time US Open Champion, Andy North, playing the Sandbox with a couple of friends including Aaron Rodgers. No big deal.

The fourth is a nice little par three with a tumultuous green:

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Hole 4: 78/60/42

The fifth is one of the most beautiful golf greens I’ve ever seen. The left-to-right spine is like a hog’s back – one would think the green going from the right side toward a left-side pin would curl that way, but it doesn’t… Both sides roll outward, meaning your “safe shot” to the right side to avoid that doozy of a front pot bunker can very well result in a 20- to 30-yard putt.

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Hole 5: 105/73/43

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Hole 5: 105/73/43

While the sixth may lull you to sleep with its short distance, be wary of all the bunkers surrounding this pin, and all the slopes that will lead you toward them:

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Hole 6: 80/67/40

The seventh might be the best of the run-up holes on the entire 17-hole course – a fairway that runs downhill to a narrow, angled green that runs uphill toward the left.

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Hole 7: 51/42/36

The front eight of the Sandbox ends in spectacular fashion, with a beautiful elevated biarritz green.

When asked to write a 100-word blurb on my favorite hole in the Sandbox, this is the one that dominated my thoughts. This green is absolutely spectacular. Watch for my little quote and photo(s) in the Sand Valley newsletter 😉

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Hole 8: 98/86/41

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Hole 8: 98/86/41

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Hole 8: 98/86/41

The back nine starts with what I would consider to be the course’s “Short” hole. At around 50 yards, the challenge here is the green that is one of the largest on the entire property.

The green on nine is the result of combining two different greens. Owner and Developer Mike Keiser told Coore and Crenshaw to build as many great golf holes as they could find on this property. If memory serves me correctly, they found 23, and then had to figure out a way to route it right. The two holes that were originally here were made better by combining them in to one.

Think 50 yards is too easy? Try landing a shot above the back ledge and holding this green.

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Hole 9: 57/52/42

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Hole 9: 57/52/42

The tenth is one of the smallest greens on the course, and a fun distance just over 100 yards.

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Hole 10: 107/83/45

The eleventh features a risen green with squirrely slopes, especially towards the edges. Taking on the trap almost seems like the safe play here.

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Hole 11: 74/48/30

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Hole 11: 74/48/30

The fifth longest hole on the course, the twelfth reminded me a lot of the sixth hole at Hidden Glen. A long green from front to back, the putting surface is risen and well defended by sand and swales.

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Hole 12: 115/96/52

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Hole 12: 115/96/52

To me, the tiny 13th is probably the hardest tee shot of all 17. Maxing out at 75 yards and slightly downhill, the lion’s mouth green leaves no room for error. The sand trap in front is the one golfers will try to avoid, but the ones left and past the green are just as penal if not more so.

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Hole 13: 75/54/36

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Hole 13: 75/54/36

Approaching the 14th, we saw a couple more familiar faces: Bill Coore and Jim Craig. Coore needs no introduction, and Jimmy has been Coore/Crenshaw’s Shaping Specialist for two decades. Both are wonderful people to run in to, and are always more than gracious with their time and thoughts.

The fourteenth is fairly long for the Sandbox, teeing up from a hearty 120 yards. A trap on the right side of the foreground shrouds a sizable right-side section of the green, giving the impression off the tee that the target area is much, much smaller than it is.

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Hole 14: 120/94/45

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Hole 14: 120/94/45

A similar distance to the previous hole, the fifteenth plays from 121 yards to a green that could not be more diametrically opposite. The putting complex on fifteen is wide open with all its curves and beauty on full display.

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Hole 15: 121/96/55

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Hole 15: 121/96/55

The 16th is the longest of the par threes in the Sandbox, and deservedly so as an awesome redan template:

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Hole 16: 149/96/43

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Hole 16: 149/96/43

A classic finishing hole, the 17th presents two options: Do or die. Hit that massive pot bunker at the front-middle entrance of the green and the prospects of winning your match will do the latter.

And a pot bunker of this magnitude needs to be aptly named, right? This one’s nickname is certainly befitting: It’s “the devil’s a@$hole.”

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Hole 17: 83/55/35

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Hole 17: 83/55/35

The Sandbox is the perfect complement to the world-class, championship golfing experience at Sand Valley. While stout in distance, the Sandbox lives up to its hype as providing the most extreme greens and some of the most thought-provoking holes on the property, making this short walk massive in enjoyment.

 

Course Wrap-Up:
Location: Rome, WI
Yardage: Crenshaw-1652, Coore-1272, Putting-739
Slope/Rating: N/A
Par: 51
Weekend Rates: $75

Sand Valley Golf Resort, Sandbox Website

North Hills Country Club 2018 Golf Membership Information

Over the past two months, the most read article on my site has been about the 2016 North Hills Country Club New Membership Promotion.

While that membership drive has expired, they do have some great new programs in place. I want to make sure you folks looking for that are not reading outdated information, so the following is this year’s membership drive.

* As a caveat, the 2016 membership drive at North Hills was a massive success! The club added over 70 new members that year, almost all of whom are under the age of 40.

Other exciting things going on at North Hills include a renovated basement with a golf simulator that should be finished this fall, and continued improvements to the course and facilities in accordance with architect Jay Blasi’s master plan.

Please reach out to me via email at wiscosportsaddict@gmail.com if you are potentially interested in joining North Hills.

I would be happy to send you the rest of the prospective membership files/documents,  maybe show you around the club and answer any questions you may have. If I don’t have the answers, I can get you in touch with the people who do. It can potentially be mutually beneficial as the club offers a solid referral program.

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Golf & Social Page 1

Golf & Social Page 2

For more fun reading about North Hills Country Club in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin:

Golf Course Review: The Oconee at Reynolds Lake Oconee (GA)

One of the top golf destinations in the southeastern United States, Reynolds Lake Oconee is home to 117 golf holes. 18 of the best of those are on its Oconee course, designed by Rees Jones and originally unveiled in 2002.

Jones inherited some of the best terrain on the entire property to work with for the back nine of the Oconee course, meandering through inlets and setting up gorgeous tee shots over water on the par three 15th and closing par four 18th.

The 18th is one of the strongest finishing holes I’ve ever played, driving over Lake Oconee from 466 yards from the tips and still 426 from the third tees in.

What it lacks in lake frontage, the front nine makes up for with elevation. The fifth through ninth holes all have elevated tee shots, highlighted by a beautiful pair of par threes (5 and 8).

In addition to thousands of visitors, the Oconee course has played host to the annual Linger Longer Invitational college championship, the 2007 PGA Cup and the annual Chik-fil-A Bowl Challenge. Along with Great Waters, the Oconee helps put the premier in Reynolds Lake Oconee’s premier golfing destination.

The course begins with a long par five, measuring 538 yards from the first tees in. A small pond comes in to play about 450 yards down the fairway, and the green resides off a short dogleg left alongside the water.

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Hole 1: Par 5 (559/538/513/417)

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Hole 1: Par 5 (559/538/513/417)

Hole two at The Oconee is a mid-range par four with an interesting green complex. Heavily protected on all other sides, the pin while we were there was right in the front-right – the only area not bunkered.

You’ll see on the second hole that the Oconee course puts a premium on accurate driving. It’s heavily wooded but very fair – none of us had significant issues keeping our tee shots in play.

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Hole 2: Par 4 (397/377/367/315)

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My Top 50 Golf Courses in America

When my brother and his wife bought me a golf ball cabinet about ten years ago, I started collecting logo balls from all the different courses I played. I hadn’t started my foray in to golf writing at the time so its contents grew slowly but steadily, consisting primarily of muni tracks around Waukesha County.

I started WiscoGolfAddict in 2011, and during that year played 59 different courses including three of my first private clubs. With 2012 came my first out-of-state golf trips: Myrtle Beach with my cousins Frank and Jeff, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan with a group of friends. It was also the year I played my first Tour courses, including Erin Hills, Blackwolf Run’s River course, Chambers Bay, University Ridge and Cog Hill No. 4 Dubsdread. I played 126 rounds in 2012 at a total of 52 different courses.

While I’d consider 2012 to be the year that opened my eyes to world-class golf, I’d also consider it to be the year that opened my eyes to the way golf can drain my bank account. An audit of my post-season golf charges that year was just shy of $10,000.

My first media event invites started coming in 2013, first for a pre-event media day at the John Deere Classic at TPC Deere Run, and soon after a weekend trip to Madden’s Resort on Gull Lake in Brainerd, Minnesota. Exciting things with my golf writing were starting to snowball, and they have only continued to this day.

Through my writing I have experienced amazing public and private golf courses around the country, built out a wonderful network of industry experts and friends, and am continuously learning about all the things that make golf great – especially from the design and architectural side.

The experts (Doak, Fazio, Coore, Crenshaw, Jones, Staples, Trent Jones, Jr, …) may score 80-95 on a scale of 100 for their course design knowledge. I can’t claim to know more than 10-20, which is probably still generous, but the path to learning is filled with playing new styles of courses and constantly picking up on the both subtle and not-so-subtle nuances that architects institute in their designs. It’s an adventure I hope to enjoy for years to come.

While Golf Digest, GolfWeek and Golf.com release their best courses in the US lists on an annual or semi-annual basis, I have just one: This running list of the 50 tracks I consider to be the best in the country… out of the hundreds that I’ve played.

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1. Pacific Dunes (Bandon, OR)

Architect: Tom Doak (2001)
Yardages: Black-6633, Green-6142, Gold-5775
Slope/Rating: Black-142/73.0, Green-133/70.7, Gold-129/68.6

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The Top 50 Golf Courses in America (click here for the list)