Lawsonia: One of Wisconsin’s Best 36-Hole Destinations

For my money, there’s probably no better spot in the state of Wisconsin for 36 holes than Lawsonia. An hour and fifteen minutes from Milwaukee, Lawsonia offers two distinct golfing experiences: The all-world Langford/Moreau classic Links course, and the tree-lined, scenic Woodlands course.

I made this year’s first pilgrimage to Lawsonia two weeks ago, and this time brought with me a new gadget.

My friend, Troy, had been telling me how easy it is to use the DJI Spark drone, and he let me borrow his to try out for a couple of weeks.

Like any golfer, I’ve always salivated over amazing drone footage of great golf holes. No one I’ve seen recently has done that better than Andy Johnson of The Fried Egg. For a terrific example, see his video from Lawsonia here:

“The Boldest Value in Golf: Lawsonia Links” – video credit: Andy Johnson, The Fried Egg

Despite having no drone or video editing skills, I fumbled around enough to take a couple nice shots I wanted to share. The first is one of my favorite par fours: The second hole on the Woodlands course.

Lawsonia Woodlands hole 2: Par 4 from the sky

A view from the sky shows the strategic value in playing off the tee to the fairway right of the quarry: A clear shot to the green.

Another great par four on the Woodlands course is the curvy, up-and-down fourteenth (click image for video):

Lawsonia Woodlands hole 14: Par 4 from the sky

Finally, a video of Phillip’s tee shot on the famous par three seventh on the Links course (click image for video):

As an aside, I didn’t realize until after this trip that I haven’t updated my review and photos of the Links course since it was deforested in 2014. I’ll aim to re-shoot the course and update photos sometime during the 2019 season.

And, finally, to all the dads out there… Happy Father’s Day!

Early Season Golf at Whistling Straits & Golf Kohler

There are a number of different ways to play Whistling Straits, and none of them are cheap. Playing it during the early Spring and late Fall, though, will save money.

Normal folks like myself have a hard time dishing out $600 for a round at the Straits, so one of the most common questions I get asked is how and when to play it.

The answer: Whenever you can afford it and have a good group to go with. The more economical answer, though, depends on the year. Kohler’s current promotion has early-season deals through Friday, May 9, which include:

  • Whistling Straits, Straits course: $190
  • Whistling Straits, Irish course: $80
  • Blackwolf Run: River course: $130
  • Blackwolf Run: Meadow Valleys course: $80

The next round of deals goes up significantly, making this week the perfect time to play it. Golf Kohler rates from May 10 to June 3:

  • Whistling Straits, Straits course: $300
  • Whistling Straits, Irish course: $130
  • Blackwolf Run, River course: $210
  • Blackwolf Run, Meadow Valleys course: $130

Now here’s where early-season rates get tricky…

There’s a fine line between taking advantage of early-season rates on one of the top five courses in the country and playing it on soupy, brown terrain. I won’t pretend to know everything about fescue grass, but a combination of the Straits course’s turf type and its proximity to the lake can mean a less than beautiful setting during some early Spring seasons.

The trick is to get as close to the final day of the early-season rates as possible, and to consult the course ahead of time if you’re concerned about how it’ll look and play.

For example, here is the second fairway on the Straits course during the final week of the initial early-season rates during two very different years:

The fairway on 2 at the Straits course on May 8, 2014 – soupy, soggy, brown, slow

In stark contrast, the course greened up very quickly this year, and in fact the conditions right now are legendarily good. In other words, if you can get a tee time on the Straits course this week (by May 9, 2019), book it. If you can’t and are on a budget, book it before June 3.

The fairway on 2 at the Straits course on May 5, 2019 – really good

As you can see, the big difference between what the course looks like right now versus what it looks like during peak season is in the fescue off the fairways – it just hasn’t grown in yet.

The fairway on 2 at the Straits course on August 10, 2014 – perfect

Additional photos from Sunday’s round on the Straits course:

It should be mentioned that the Blackwolf Run and Irish courses are much less volatile than the Straits, so if you’re looking for a world-class round of golf on one of them, feel confident in booking it that the conditions will be worth the investment.

Just like your game probably won’t be in mid-season form yet, though, don’t expect perfection quite yet – that’s why they’re offering early-season deals. The greens will probably still be a little choppy and on the slower side, the native grasses won’t be grown out yet, and tee shots probably won’t get as much run as they will in July… But chances are you’re still going to love the round.

WiscoGolfAddict review of Whistling Straits: Straits course (2014)

WiscoGolfAddict review of Whistling Straits, Irish course (2011)

WiscoGolfAddict review of Blackwolf Run, River course (2012)

WiscoGolfAddict review of Blackwolf Run, Meadow Valleys course (2014)

Welcome, Quinn Caroline!

It’s been some time since I’ve posted anything, and for good reason: I’m a new dad again! On January 29, my wife Kelly and our son, Charlie, and I welcomed our daughter Quinn Caroline to this world.

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Life’s been very busy in the Seifert household, but I’m looking forward to getting back to writing golf-related articles for you all soon. I’m also looking forward to featuring interesting contributing writers… More to come on that soon.

We can all be happy Punxsutawney Phil predicted an early spring this year, but I’m not sure I’m buying it after witnessing a mild holiday season that led to massive snow storms and unbearably cold weather. Actual air temperatures hit -30 degrees while we were in the hospital with Quinn, and the wind chill dipped to 60-below! It was bad.

I’m excited for the golf season to get here, though, and look forward to playing more new courses this year. I’m especially hoping to check out and review new (for me) private clubs like the Legend courses, Oconomowoc, Blue Mound and others. With two kids under two I know I’ll have to be selective and strategic about my rounds… Challenge accepted.

I hope you’re all doing well, enjoying the off-season and maybe even getting in some non-Wisconsin bonus golf. There’s a lot to look forward to, that’s for sure. Happy 2019!

Always,
Paul

Holiday Gift Guide & Golf Equipment Review: Arccos Caddie

Combining two of my favorite things, golf and data, Arccos has quickly become my favorite piece of golf equipment… And if you’re still looking for the perfect gift for a golfer in your life, ensure your spot as their favorite person by letting them open up Arccos Caddie (fka Arccos 360) or Arccos Caddie Smart Grips this holiday season. It’s what my favorite person got me for Christmas last year 🙂

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In its simplest form, Arccos is an unobtrusive game improvement system that helps golfers improve their skills and enjoyment of the game through artificial intelligence and next-gen data analysis. It puts all the information – historical data, predictive analysis, weather and geographical factors, … – all at players’ fingertips so they’re well-informed before, during and after rounds.

At $199.99 for the system (including 13 club grips and one for the putter), I can’t imagine a better golf investment.

So how’s it work? With Arccos Caddie, quarter-sized sensors screw in to the end of each  grip (there is a special one for the putter). They’re easily paired using the system’s intuitive smartphone app, and with it opened during play, collect and analyze an endless number of data points.

Through a strategic partnership with Microsoft Azure, Arccos Caddie leverages artificial intelligence using the world’s largest database of golf shots, course knowledge and weather conditions. Sensors are activated when upright (not in a golf bag) to preserve battery power, and they track shots via Bluetooth (GPS location, club used, etc.) using your cell phone’s microphone.

The Caddie system makes recommendations based on past behavior and course conditions, using inner (60%) distances that disregard values in the 0-20th and 80-100th percentiles. Distances are given to the front, middle and back of each green, along with wind speed and changes in elevation.

Even though a lot of people think I’m a long hitter, I know I don’t hit the ball like Dustin Johnson does. You probably don’t, either. Rather than dwell on what you think you should hit the ball, wouldn’t you rather know the distance you actually do hit it?

For example…

How far do you hit your 7-iron? Most younger, lowish-handicap players will default to saying between 165-180, which is what I figured for myself. With one season of using Arccos under my belt, I can tell you that I hit mine between 145 and 164, and average 154. The max (an outlier) this year was 188. If I’m on a par three over water that needs at least 165 to carry, I am armed with information most players are not.

Arccos Caddie also provides “plays like” shot yardage, factoring in actual yardage along with various weather, wind and elevation elements. If I’m on the par three seventh at North Hills Country Club, and it’s 174 yards to the pin and obviously well uphill, all I knew before was I’d need to hit my tee shot more than 174 yards.

Using Arccos Caddie, I’m provided all the data and even a club selection that takes every factor in to consideration. Some of that specific functionality needs to be turned off during competitive play, of course, but it’s invaluable during practice rounds and competitive preparation.

I also know the holes I need to rethink my strategy on. For example, below is my statistical history at North Hills since getting Arccos:

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My 2018 golf course performance summary at North Hills Country Club

The third, fifth, tenth, 14th and 17th are really tough holes, but why am I having issues on the first? Especially when I hit the green in regulation 61.1% of the time?

Another cool feature is that Arccos allows players to relive their favorite rounds and golf holes. For example, I had this beauty at Streamsong Blue in February:

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My best hole at Streamsong Blue this past February (par four 18th)

331 down the pipe on a 474-yard par four finishing hole was a great way to end my trip. I can actually go through all the rounds I played last year and relive all my shots. I love that.

Even if you’re not a data junkie like me, you can probably appreciate this next fact: Players who purchased Arccos Caddie in 2017 improved by an average of 3.55 strokes per 18 holes.

My game was inconsistent at best this year, getting to play just over 20 total rounds, but the handicap Arccos kept for me (8.7) was consistent with my official USGA one.

The only negatives I’ve come up with so far are that A) I had a sensor fall off and get lost, B) The Bluetooth app can drain my cell phone’s battery life, C) It can be a little uncomfortable having my cell phone in my pants pocket while golfing, and D) While the putting sensor is more accurate than I expected it to be, it still needs some checking to make sure the right number of putts are calculated.

Great products have great solutions, and Arccos can remedy three of these issues. Regarding the lost sensor, Arccos’ customer service was easy to work with and quickly sent me a replacement sensor (they’re available on their website for $19.99 each).

For the phone issues, Arccos’ 2018 updates included smart watch functionality, taking the phone out-of-pocket and working instead with the Bluetooth in your watch. I haven’t gotten a smart watch yet, but it’s on my list of potential purchases in 2019.

I always confirm the number of putts following my rounds, and it’s really not a big deal.

If you have a golfer on your Christmas list, Arccos Caddie or Arccos Smart Grips (sensors are built in to the grips) are a can’t-miss gift idea. Or, if you’re looking for a sure-fire way to help improve your own golf game this year, get it for yourself. Either way, I cannot say enough how much I enjoy using Arccos Caddie, and how highly I recommend implementing it in to your own golf routine. The more I use it, the more valuable data I get… And the more interesting it is to dig in to all the nuances of golf that make the off-course part of the game so much fun.

Arccos Caddie Website

Blue Skies & Fall Colors

Let’s be honest: This has not been the best Wisconsin golf season.

We didn’t get started until mid-May, September was spent largely underwater and it has all the looks and feels of a season ending way too early in October.

While an early Winter is depressing to think about, Fall golf in the Midwest is stunningly beautiful and I was able to get out last weekend for a round that started out cold and dim, but ended up with bright blue skies and gorgeous Fall colors.

I had to snap a few pics on my cart ride home:

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A look back from the green on the par four 3rd hole at North Hills CC in Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin

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View from the tee on the par five 4th hole at North Hills

Comparatively, here was the same view last month toward the height of a weeks-long deluge:

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The par five 4th hole at North Hills flooded by the Menomonee River during September, 2018

Speaking of underwater, here was the unintentional island green on the par four 6th. Not only was half of the course unplayable, the rotting smell and subsequent weeks–long mosquito infestation was almost unbearable.

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